Johnny Depp Excited to Mix It Up in Pirates of the Carribean 4: Waiting for Godot Sparrow

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Photo: Courtesy of Walt Disney Pictures

"Well, at this point, what I'm trying to do is change it into a Beckett play. I don't know. It could be anything now at this point. Jack Sparrow could be in some geisha clothing. I don't know. We could explore other possibilities."—Johnny Depp is planning on getting highfalutin with Pirates of the Caribbean 4 [Female First]

"My religious upbringing was comically strict — even the Dirt Devil vacuum cleaner was banned. In our house, no one was allowed to refer to deviled eggs. We had to call them angelic eggs. We were never allowed to swear. I'd get into trouble just for saying 'Hell no.' If you dropped a hammer on your toe in our house you had to say something like 'Jiminy Christmas.' The only music we were allowed to listen to was gospel. No wonder I rebelled."—Katy Perry on why she penned her faux-lesbian hit [Contact Music]

"She just looked at my hand and said 'what do you do?' and I just felt really awkward and thought, 'Ahh, I've been snubbed by Madonna!' I did think it was a bit rude but you get over it. I would've been kind of disappointed if she was really nice though, you know?”—British rocker James Morrison on what Madonna is really like [Mirror UK]

"It's fun to be the new kid on the block. Instead of being the Godfather of Rap when you walk into the room, you're the new guy with the new show. Acting is a wonderful, wonderful exercise and a wonderful thing to experience. It's like playing with G.I. Joes when you're a kid and imagining you're in a battle."—LL Cool J on taking a break from rap to act [Contact Music]

"I'm playing a character named Blondie and it's set in a brothel in the 1950s, so there's not a whole lot of clothes."—Vanessa Hudgens won't say "naked" about her role in Sucker Punch [E! Online]

"People question the legitimacy of my subject matter. My characters seem privileged. There's a socialist bias to the consensus of the literary world: a 30s mentality that says factory workers are more worthy of our attention. But my most representative characters are privileged educationally and culturally, not financially. Also, these people are influential. They have a lot to do with the way the rest of us end up living. I don't think they should escape our scrutiny. They own TV stations and newspapers; they manipulate the markets. It's interesting to check in on them."—Jay McInerney defends his hoity-toity characters [Guardian UK]