‘The biggest early-90s trends currently revisiting us, after all, are recession, a stagnant job market and doubt about the worth of higher education.’

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Here’s Carl Wilson on the current wave of 90s nostalgia: “Are 1990s-evoking equivalents of The Big Chill or That ’70s Show sure to follow? Might Claire Danes be persuaded to star in ‘My So-Called Adulthood’? Angela could be a mommy blogger wearing a lot of plaid flannel robes. I admit I would watch it, just as I can’t tear myself away from Winona Ryder’s romantic and financial travails in Reality Bites whenever I stumble on the 1994 movie on TV. (One of The Onion’s most biting headlines this year: ‘Winona Ryder finally agrees to sleep with Generation X.’) Such cultural comfort food comes with an acrid wave of reflux, though, because when movies like Reality Bites or even the sitcom Friends were new, I scorned them as cash-ins on the hype about adrift, ambitionless young people — cheap Hollywood holidays launched from my peer group’s misery. The biggest early-90s trends currently revisiting us, after all, are recession, a stagnant job market and doubt about the worth of higher education.”