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MOONRAKER, Desmond Llewelyn, Roger Moore, 1979.

toys in bondland

Eight Bond Gadgets That Have Not Aged Well

Usually, James Bond has got gadgets and gizmos a-plenty. However, in Skyfall, (maybe because the new Q is too busy buying smart cardigans) he employs a more spartan approach, only employing a personalized handgun (which he basically already did in Licence to Kill) and a miniscule radio. This is understandable. Bond's gadgets — though iconic and whimsical — were sometimes impractical and, looking back, often seem dated. The worst ones don't hold up at all. Here are eight gadgets that didn’t age as well as Bond's taste for martinis. 

Cigarette Lighter Radio

(Live and Let Die)

One of the many gizmos cellular phones made obsolete. Though, it might come in handy if Bond wanted to make a call while not disturbing his phone's Pandora streaming.

Hair Brush Radio

(Live and Let Die)

"What's that? Sorry, you're breaking up. What are you calling me from? Oh, a brush? Call me back from your phone."

Paper Watch

(The Spy Who Loved Me)

Not only is it a watch with a built-in pager, but the pages come in the form of label maker-like printouts. It's quaint how dated it is. Like an old lady trying to rap.

Identigraph

(For Your Eyes Only)

Remember when people didn't know what computers could do, so they just made up programs in which you select a person's characteristics from a list (i.e. hair color, nose shape) and it creates a 3D line drawing facsimile? Sure, Q, that sounds like a computer.

Ghetto Blaster

(The Living Daylights)

This was discontinued by the CIA, after the tragic death of uncover agent/ring wearer Radio Raheem.

Laser/X-Ray Polaroid

(License To Kill)

Criminal 1: "I thought they stopped making those."
Criminal 2: "Also, why are we letting James Bond take our photograph?"

Explosive Alarm Clock

(License To Kill)

At this point, the only reason to buy an alarm clock is if you need it to explode.

Simulation Glasses

(Die Another Day)

Every kid in England has access to better video game technology than this.

Photo: United Artists/Courtesy Everett Collection