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Lauryn Hill Is Working on New Music, She Says

Signer Lauryn Hill is seen leaving court after the judge postpones her sentencing and gave her two weeks to pay back taxes April 22, 2013 in Newark, New Jersey.  Hill pleaded guilty to tax evasion charges in June 2012 for failure to pay federal taxes on USD 1.8 million earned from 2005-2007. She faces a maximum one-year jail sentence for each of the three accounts.

Lauryn Hill confirmed on Tumblr today that she is indeed working on new music and that she's launching her own label through Sony, on which she plans to release this new record. (Yes, she still has two weeks to pay back taxes.) Hill, who hasn't released a studio album since her 1998 masterpiece The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill, writes:

I've remained silent, after an extensive healing process. This has been a 10+ year battle, for a long time played out behind closed doors, but now in front of the public eye. This is an old conflict between art and commerce… free minds, and minds that are perhaps overly tethered to structure. This is about inequity, and the resulting disenfranchisement caused by it. I've been fighting for existential and economic freedom, which means the freedom to create and live without someone threatening, controlling, and/or manipulating the art and the artist, by tying the purse strings.

It took years for me to get out of the 'parasitic' dynamic of my youth, and into a deal that better reflects my true contribution as an artist, and (purportedly) gives me the control necessary to create a paradigm suitable for my needs. I have been working towards this for a long time, not just because of my current legal situation, but because I am an artist, I love to create, and I need the proper platform to do so.

The nature of my new business venture, as well as the dollar amount reported, was inaccurate, only a portion of the overall deal. Keep in mind, my past recordings have sold over 50,000,000 units worldwide, earning the label a tremendous amount of money (a fraction of which actually came to me).

Hill goes on to say that she is "one artist who finds value in openly discussing the dynamics within this industry that force artists to compromise or distort themselves and what they do, rather than allowing them to make the music that people need," and that there are "volumes that could (and will) be said." Promise? Maybe, like, a two-volume album?

Photo: Kena Betancur/Getty Images